creative campaigns Tag

sceptical baby social media

5 simple ways to engage your audience on social media

Ever wanted to have your own shop selling stuff you love or be a radio presenter recognised and adored for your sense of humour? If you’re active on social media, you’re already taking on roles like these.

Social media is space we all curate – whether it’s our personal brand (of life being amazing all the time) or a business’s brand (of the business’s values, products, lifestyle). Visual platforms like Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram and Tumblr can be compared to custom magazines and you could say that Twitter is like having your own transcribed podcast beaming out to followers who are tuned in. So what are you doing with your curated spaces? Getting people to participate is one of the best ways to build loyalty. Here are five simple ways to get followers to engage.

1. Polls

Polls are a great way to get feedback from your community while not asking them to make much of an effort. There are plenty of apps out there to facilitate them – just be aware of your settings: pranksters can have (hilarious but) devastating effects when you allow the public to add suggestions.

2. Competitions

For as long as society has used pronouns, people have loved free stuff. Facebook recently slackened the rules for running competitions which has made life a lot easier. By using an entry mechanism where ‘liking’ your page is a condition, you can build follower numbers quickly. After that, it’s up to you to keep them around.

3. Videos

Generally, we’re a pretty lazy society and there’s no better example of this than our internet habits. We would much rather watch a short clip than read a paragraph of text. Film is a multi-sensory experience and, while it’s expensive in relation to writing text, the impression it gives is incomparable and you can get a lot of mileage out of it. A short, captivating clip to introduce your brand and a number of key points can be used in presentations, on your website, and shared on all of your social media platforms.

4. Links

Your curated space doesn’t have to be made up exclusively of original content. While a certain amount is crucial, your brand’s online presence can also be a hub for relevant and useful content. You can be the go-to place for all things [insert your field here].

5. Photos

Because they communicate immediately and powerfully, images are some of the most shareable content on the internet, especially when overlayed with text. There are plenty of easy-to-use, free tools out there such as PicMonkey which make creating this kind of content a cinch.

If you’d like to take your social media to the next level, check out 26 Facebook Fan Engagement Tips or get in touch about our social media workshops and social media management.

Five tips for working with small businesses

Generally, by the time we work with small businesses, they’ve survived early development, have a strong sense of who they are, and are ready take their marketing and branding seriously. This is never more true than with small businesses in the fashion industry. But how is working with these types of clients different to others? Here are five tips that worked for us with local fashion businesses, Soul Society and White Rabbit Days.

Before we get cracking, here’s some White Rabbit Days fabulousness:

 

1. Listen

While these clients have lived their brand since they were brave enough to go out on their own, they generally haven’t been asked to articulate it formally, so discussing business plans and marketing strategy is often a first foray into outlining strategy. Our workshops have proved valuable in these situations by giving the client clarity and strategy to build on, and by giving us insight into the business.

It’s only by really listening that you can get a sense of what makes the business different. And, in the end, that’s the story you need to tell.

2. Figure out what they need from you

Don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Rather figure out why they came to you. For instance, Soul Society already had a great website and really strong branding. What they needed from us was help telling their story, which is exactly what we did for them.

3. Evoke the juice

Find out what makes the brand you’re working with special and communicate that. For instance, Helen, the designer behind White Rabbit has a really animated way of speaking – making up words and cracking jokes all the time – and we used that sensibility across the copy in the website. For example, the name White Rabbit Days comes from the way Helen used to explore a new city with friends on her travels.

You pick a direction, choose a road, a door, jump on a bus; follow the white rabbit (in a non-druggie way) and see where it takes you, what treasures you find, who you meet and where you end up.

4. Be flexible

Small businesses have particular pressures. Often the person you’re liaising with is also responsible for many other things like manufacturing, distribution and accounts. They’re juggling problems and opportunities all the time and this means that you might not have direct access all the time. Once you can arrange it, however, you can make decisions with the client very quickly.

Cash flow is another things that can be difficult for small businesses. Being flexible is crucial to being able to have a good working relationship.

5. Stay in touch

You never know where these businesses are going and who they’re connected to. Every big business was once small – stay in touch and who knows where they might take you!

Here’s some Soul Society fabulousness:

Soul Society

 

Select a brand to go to their Facebook page:

Soul SocietyLogo White Rabbit Days

 

Featured (top) image source

vine

Rise and Vine! Get the low-down on this micro video app

Over on our Facebook page, we recently launched Vine Vednesdays (Wine Wednesdays are still alive and well, remain calm). Named after a ‘Vignette’, a short impressionistic scene, this mobile app enables its users to create and post short looping video clips.

Why it works

The limitations of time (7 seconds) and editing (the camera records only while the screen is being touched) has forced users to become increasingly creative and to plan their precious moments. The result? Some really original entertainment.

In terms of watching Vines, the brevity of the looping clip makes the app mesmerising.

What people are doing with it

1.Capturing moments: watch cute kittens getting tickled or the view from  parasailing over turquoise waters.

2. Making moments: check out guys pulling off amazing tricks and some slightly bizarre theatrical moments.

3. Dorseying: founder, Jack Dorsey loves to take a selfie (usually half a selfie actually) with a scene, landmark or moment going on behind him. Dorseying has inspired many an entertaining parody.

For a taste of what’s out there, check out Vine’s Twitter account or just keep an eye on our Facebook feed for the best of the best every Vednesday.

vine infographic

Sources: http://www.cnbc.com/id/100807818,
http://eggboss.com/technology/10-facts-probably-didnt-know-vine/

Five things you didn’t know about Mxit

If you think it’s just a place where people’s spelling and grammar abilities go to die, you’re wrong. Here are five things you didn’t know about Mxit.

bigstock-Bright-Idea-Kid-1024x860

1.    It’s a solution to a gaming problem.

Mxit originated in Stellenbosch when Swist Group Technologies was developing a massive multiplayer mobile game named Alaya, which was a flop because it was sms-based and too expensive for the user. They reassessed and released the game and MXit in 2003.

2.    It’s not just for teenagers.

Mxit is now Africa’s largest mobile social network, boasting 750 million messages sent per day and 10 million active subscribers.

 3.    It’s helping money move safely.

teenager on phone

You can send money to people, buy airtime and electricity, deposit and withdraw from your bank account. Check it out here.

4.    It gives free access to counselling and educational material.

Mxit offers counselling to youth via text by partnering with LoveLife (which focuses on HIV and AIDS), Childline (which focuses on abuse) and Angel (which focuses on gang members and substance abuse). Learners can also access Maths and Science textbooks made available by publisher, Siyavula.

 5.    It’s proving to be a serious marketing tool.

Kimberly Clark has used Mxit to launch a global Kotex campaign. If this sounds familiar, it’s because we featured Kotex’s Pinterest campaign on the blog just last week.

This Mxit campaign targets young females aged 13 to 35 with brand splash screens (full screen ads that display each time a user launches the site), leading users to a customised and branded app where it’s reported that users hung around for as long as 14.7 minutes.

Through the app, users were offered a gateway to the exchange of product information, polls around sensitive feminine topics, prizes and coupons, and they could engage in one-on-one sessions with a trusted gynaecologist, offering a free, private, safe and anonymous resource for advice and information.

kotex Mxit campaign

Winning pinning: Three great Pinterest campaigns

Pinterest. It took a while for people to catch on to this social media platform in South Africa (and to be able to pronounce the name – “pin-interest”? Awkies.), but it’s growing rapidly. There are currently just under 50 million users worldwide. My mom is one of them. Just saying. Yip – best you get on that, if you’re not already.

Because it’s such a visually-rich platform – Pinterest is like a big digital pinboard that allows users to create and curate theme-based image collections, in case you weren’t sure – it has been used very creatively by brands in some nifty campaigns.

There are loads of examples of great uses of Pinterest floating around the internet. These three are of our favourites:

UNICEF ‘S Ami Musa

UNICEF Pinterest

The whole attraction of Pinterest for many people is that it is a platform of aspiration. It allows them to pin pictures of items that, in a perfect world, they would love to have: a dream wardrobe here, an ideal home there, places they’d love to travel to – the list goes on. And then UNICEF showed up and turned the whole concept upside down. They created a fictional character, Ami Musa, a 13-year-old girl from Sierra Leone. She has one board. It is called: “Really want these”. “These” are running water, soap, basic food, shoes, an education – things that we take for granted.

6 pins. 1550 followers – all left with something to think about.

Kotex pop-up store

So this is pretty clever. Kotex and Tel Aviv marketing agency Smoyz got together and created the first ever pop-up Pinterest store. Intrigued? I was too. The store was designed to look like a Pinterest board, and local women lined up for a chance to “pin and win” whatever was inside the mystery gift boxes. Each box had a sentence on it, and ladies had to pick a sentence that inspired them and pin that sentence to their Pinterest board in order to win the contents of the box.

Free stuff + Pinterest – what’s not to love, right? The store attracted a decent amount of attention pretty quickly. Never underestimate the power of an excited woman and a smartphone. Marketing mileage for days on social media.

Clever Kotex, clever.

GIRLS fan art

GIRLS fan art

There are a lot of great series out there that get under people’s skin and crawl into their hearts. Most of these series inspire awesome fan art – but HBO’s GIRLS actually showcases it on their fanGIRLS board. Great use of Pinterest, girls.

P.S. Watch this show. If you haven’t – where have you been?

GIRLS fan art

 

P.P.S. Follow Pomegranite on Pinterest and check our our boards of things that inspire usbeautiful office spaces, useful infographicssocial media laughs, ALL the pomegranates, and all things proudly Cape Town.